Dough Doughnuts opens in Downtown Brooklyn

By Brooklyn Star Staff

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Brooklyn-based donut shop Dough Doughnuts is now expanding to Downtown Brooklyn.

Beginning on Sept. 22 Dough will be joining Time Out Market, a 21,000-square-foot waterfront food market that is home to over 20 different eateries. 

“We are thrilled to join Time Out Market New York – it’s a place people visit to get a real taste of the city so it’s a perfect spot for us and our doughnuts which you get to enjoy all day long,” Steve Klein, co-owner of Dough Doughnuts, said in a statement.

To celebrate their new 55 Water Street location, Dough will have a limited release of a new exclusive flavor, the Brooklyn Blackout: a chocolate brioche doughnut filled with chocolate pudding, topped with semisweet chocolate glaze and sprinkled with chocolate cake crumbs. The new DUMBO location will also feature Bonjourno Artisanal Coffee, a roasted coffee from Western Europe, to get your caffeine fix.

Dough will also be giving out a free t-shirt or cofee mug with a purchase of sixdoughnuts.  

St. Josephs University moves up 30 ranks in best colleges

By Brooklyn Star Staff

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St. Joseph’s University, New York was once again named one of the nation’s top universities by U.S. News & World Report, moving up 30 spots in the rankings for Regional Univerisities – North Category 

The independent university founded in the Catholic tradition, landed in a 6-way tie at #48 for top universities. St. Josephs also received accolades as the #18 Best College for Veterans; #19 top university for Undergraduate Teaching in the Regional Universities – North category and #43 for Social Mobility.

“Both our recent elevation to university status and our most recent U.S. News & World Report rankings make it clear that St. Joseph’s University, New York is an institution reaching new heights with still more to do,”  President Donald R. Boomgaarden said in a statement. . “These rankings are testaments to the hard work and dedication of our students, faculty and staff. I could not be more proud of all we have accomplished and more optimistic about the bright future that lies ahead.”

President Boomgaarden announced that the New York State Board of Regents had approved St. Joseph’s College’s petition to be elevated to university status, and would change its name to St. Joseph’s University, New York, this past April. 

With campuses in Brooklyn, Long Island and Online, SJNY was selected to this year’s list of top Regional Universities–North based on its high graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources per students, graduate indebtedness, alumni giving and social mobility, as well as the number of veterans enrolled and eligibility in the 9/11 GI® Bill Yellow Ribbon Program. 

Through its Brooklyn, Long Island and online campuses, the University offers degrees in 60 majors, special course offerings and certificates, affiliated and pre-professional programs.

Brooklyn Back To School Bash: Photos

By Brooklyn Star Staff

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Over 500 kids were served with new backpacks, fresh hair cuts, and more to get ready for the new school year at Atlantic Terminal on Saturday, (Credit: Ido Simantov)

Partners included Emblem Health, St. Joseph’s College, Brooklyn YWCA and the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority. (Credit: Ido Simantov).

Greenpoint Ferry opening delayed again

By Matthew Fischetti

[email protected]

After 16 months of repairs and delays, Greenpoint residents will have to hold out even longer to see their ferry service returned. 

On Thursday Aug. 25, Lendlease, the private developer that owns the pier, announced that service will not return until late-October or early-November, after the company previously stated that it would open at the end of this month, due to issues with the pile work.   Work on the ferry landing started in May of last year.

“Lendlease has not demonstrated the necessary urgency in returning ferry service to Greenpoint, and our community cannot trust that ferry service will return in ‘late-October/early-November’ anymore than the previous timelines that Lendlease has failed to meet,” Greenpoint Councilman Lincoln Restler said in a Thursday statement. Restler also called on the Economic Development Corporation, which oversees the NYC Ferry system, to explore alternative access at a publicly owned pier.

Assemblywoman Emily Gallagher echoed similar sentiments:“For nearly a year and a half, we have been working in good faith with Lendlease and the multiple agencies who have jurisdiction over repair work on the India Pier Ferry stop, trying to identify and resolve bureaucratic obstacles to restoring much-needed service. We are now completely out of patience. It’s clear that private entities have no place owning public transit infrastructure. The City needs to get a hold of this situation right now.”

A  spokesperson for the NYCEDC said that the group “looks forward to bring NYC Ferry service back to Greenpoint as soon as Lendlease safely restores the landing.”

A source with knowledge told the Greenpoint Star that the NYCEDC will be preparing a response to the pols’ letter in the upcoming weeks. 

 42 Hotel opens in Williamsburg

By BK Star Staff

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42 Hotel, a new luxury lodging in Williamsburg officially opened its doors to the public earlier this week. 

Located on 426 S 5th Street, the 60-room building features amenities like floor-to-ceiling windows, lounge chairs, JBL Bluetooth speakers and high speed internet access.

The hotel offers six different room packages, ranging from 240 to 320 square feet and handicap accessibility options.

Designed by architect Lucas Lee and interior designer Andres Escobar, the new hotel sports a self-described “rustic but modern” design, with Edison style bulbs adorning the lobby.

The hotel also features a beer and wine lounge, called the Community Lounge, where both local and international craft beers, and “Americana-inspired small plates” will be on the menu. Additionally, 42 Hotel has partnered with Brooklyn Speed Coffee to run their cafe, offering breakfast burritos and “third wave” coffee.

The lobby of 42 Hotel

“42 Hotel is excited to serve the residents and tourists of Williamsburg. Our hotel is all about ‘community,’ and we will be partnering with local businesses to provide hotel guests with a unique Williamsburg experience,” the management team said in a statement.

“We hope that guests will enjoy all of the details that our team has spent years on crafting.”

42 Hotel also offers perks like same-day laundry, access to a fitness center and conference room options for patrons. 

Reservations can be made directly on their website: https://42hotel.com/

 

2022 Elections Profile: Senate Candidate Elizabeth Crowley

By Matthew Fischetti

[email protected]

Elizabeth Crowley wants to represent Queens again. And Brooklyn. Oh, And Manhattan too.

Crowley, a former city councilwoman from Glendale, is running in the newly redrawn Senate 26, which straddles Western Queens, Northern Brooklyn, and Eastern Manhattan. Crowley is no newcomer to politics, coming from a large political family (her cousin was former Congressman Joseph Crowley, who AOC upset in 2018)  and has run for a slew of offices over the years.

While the district originally encompassed her home of Glendale, Crowley said that her vision and platform apply to a greater swath of New Yorkers.

“I went to college at FIT, I went to grad school in Brooklyn. I identify with the city as a whole,” Crowley said in an interview.  Crowley said that while she represented different neighborhoods back in the council, she pushed for policies that benefit New Yorkers across the board.

Crowley pushed against firehouse closures, fought to close Rikers, and advocated for increased greenway and transit options during her time on the city council. She lost re-election against Councilman Robert Holden in 2020.

“Most of them [inmates] have some level of anxiety, depression and a significant amount of the population as a serious mental health diagnosis, such as schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. And many of them have no family and no support system,” Crowley said of her decision to support bail reform, even though she noted that the legislation went too far in offering bail to alleged violent offenders.”So either way, they’re going to cycle in and out, in and out.”

Crowley said that affordability issues, child care, and education would be among her top issues if elected. In order to tackle the affordability issue, she says that New York needs to build a massive amount of affordable housing with transit to support the development.

“I have constituents in this district, over $3 million houses, in Greenpoint, pay less than property tax, then a modest, 1,000 square-foot homeowner in the district – or even, let’s say, a homeowner in southeast Queens. It’s a city-wide issue that needs to be addressed,” Crowley said, highlighting her desire for broad-based property tax reform. Earlier this year, a group of bipartisan legislators from Albany to the city council called for the issue to be addressed in the next legislative session.

While Crowley said that she wasn’t a fan of 421(a), the city’s now expired affordable housing tax break that critics said didn’t invest enough in actually affordable units, she said there still is a role for the government to subsidize construction.

She also said that she would explore options to reduce construction by “working with unions and project labor agreements to bring down wages, or to get some guarantees or give back to them for the cost of the project.” Crowley has received the most amount of support from labor unions thus far in the race.

The other candidates in the race are Kristen Gonzalez, Mike Corbett, and Nomiki Konst. The election is on Aug. 23, with early voting occurring from Aug. 13 to the 21st.

2022 Elections Profile: Senate Candidate Elizabeth Crowley

By Matthew Fischetti

[email protected]

Elizabeth Crowley wants to represent Queens again. And Brooklyn. Oh, And Manhattan too.

Crowley, a former city councilwoman from Glendale, is running in the newly redrawn Senate 26, which straddles Western Queens, Northern Brooklyn, and Eastern Manhattan. Crowley is no newcomer to politics, coming from a large political family (her cousin was former Congressman Joseph Crowley, who AOC upset in 2018)  and has run for a slew of offices over the years.

While the district originally encompassed her home of Glendale, Crowley said that her vision and platform apply to a greater swath of New Yorkers.

“I went to college at FIT, I went to grad school in Brooklyn. I identify with the city as a whole,” Crowley said in an interview.  Crowley said that while she represented different neighborhoods back in the council, she pushed for policies that benefit New Yorkers across the board.

Crowley pushed against firehouse closures, fought to close Rikers, and advocated for increased greenway and transit options during her time on the city council. She lost re-election against Councilman Robert Holden in 2020.

“Most of them [inmates] have some level of anxiety, depression and a significant amount of the population as a serious mental health diagnosis, such as schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. And many of them have no family and no support system,” Crowley said of her decision to support bail reform, even though she noted that the legislation went too far in offering bail to alleged violent offenders.”So either way, they’re going to cycle in and out, in and out.”

Crowley said that affordability issues, child care, and education would be among her top issues if elected. In order to tackle the affordability issue, she says that New York needs to build a massive amount of affordable housing with transit to support the development.

“I have constituents in this district, over $3 million houses, in Greenpoint, pay less than property tax, then a modest, 1,000 square-foot homeowner in the district – or even, let’s say, a homeowner in southeast Queens. It’s a city-wide issue that needs to be addressed,” Crowley said, highlighting her desire for broad-based property tax reform. Earlier this year, a group of bipartisan legislators from Albany to the city council called for the issue to be addressed in the next legislative session.

While Crowley said that she wasn’t a fan of 421(a), the city’s now expired affordable housing tax break that critics said didn’t invest enough in actually affordable units, she said there still is a role for the government to subsidize construction.

She also said that she would explore options to reduce construction by “working with unions and project labor agreements to bring down wages, or to get some guarantees or give back to them for the cost of the project.” Crowley has received the most amount of support from labor unions thus far in the race.

The other candidates in the race are Kristen Gonzalez, Mike Corbett, and Nomiki Konst. The election is on Aug. 23, with early voting occurring from Aug. 13 to the 21st.

Park Slope church robbed of ‘priceless’ tabernacle

St. Augustine Church in Park Slope was robbed of their tabernacle late Thursday night.

A tabernacle is an ornate encasing that holds the consecrated eucharist, which in the Catholic religion represents the literal body of christ.

The church along 6th Avenue was broken into on Friday evening according to police. The surrounding architecture was destroyed as well. The angels surrounding the tabernacle were decapitated and the eucharist was strewn across the room.

Cops say the 18 karat gold tabernacle decorated with jewels is approximately worth $2 million. But to the parishioners, a lot more was stolen.

Diane Montemarano, 68, has attended the parish for 39 years. Her father, born in 1918, was an altar boy at the church in his youth.

“I always loved coming here because, you know, he was an altar boy, and he grew up in this parish. So, personally, it’s like, a relic of my dad was taken,” Montemarano said in an interview.

The stolen tabernacle dates back to the 1890s, from when the church was built, and is described as irreplaceable by the church due to its historical and artistic significance. Burglars cut through a steel encasing with power tools. Father Tumino said that when he walked in Saturday morning he saw the door was ajar. After he walked in and saw the destruction, he could still smell the metal shavings from the tools used to break through.

Tumino also stated that the DVR that recorded the security footage within the church was stolen as well. The Father said that the parish is working with police to see if neighboring schools or businesses caught any footage of the suspects.

Tumino also speculated that due to the construction in the neighborhood, the burglars were able to break through the steel encasing without raising suspicion.

Tumino shot down the idea of an inside job at a Sunday morning press conference.

“I know it’s easy for people to say it was an inside job. But the reality is, these are also very public buildings. And so even online, there’s a history of this church,” Tumino said. “And even the history of the church does say that there is a tabernacle and that information is accessible. And because churches are available for weddings and funerals and for mass, people do come in and out.”

“This was a place where you come to gather yourself things are going wrong. You can come here and calm down and sort of get a second boost so to speak,” Michael Okebey, 58, who has been attending services at St. Augustine’s for 35 years, said. “I feel like somebody has interrupted my relationship with God in some way.

After being asked about how he felt about the crime, knowing that the approximate value of the tabernacle is $2 million, Okebey got more stern.

“Now i’m really angry,” he said, explaining that the church is currently raising funds for other projects and that this would put them further behind.

Lest We Forget: Black Veterans on Memorial Day

Black Veterans for Social Justice, founded in 1979, is a veterans service and community-based nonprofit organization headquartered in Bed-Stuy. Every year veterans can be seen marching along the little stretch of pavement between Throop Avenue and Marcus Garvey Boulevard on Willoughby Avenue in honor of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

The annual parade, now in its 11th year, has the usual fanfare: a hot sizzling grill pumping out burgers and hot dogs, the big banners and an even bigger line of marchers, as well as refreshments to stay cool in the first sweat of summer.

Attendees at Black Veterans for Social Justice Memorial Day rally in Bed-Stuy.

“This traditionally is the start of summer. And I’ve had so many people text me saying Happy Memorial Day. And although I say thank you, or sometimes I just give a thumbs up emoji. But Memorial Day is to commemorate those who have fallen, primarily on active duty, but we want to remember those who are soldiers for life, and who did not get a chance to enjoy the fruits of their retirement,” Walter Gist, a veterans outreach coordinator with the Services for the Underserved, said.

Gist is manning one of the many different types of services tables Black Veterans for Social Justice hosts to connect veterans with different kinds of support services ranging from job training and interview preparation to helping people apply for social services like ERAP funding, a pandemic-era rent relief program.

William Lugo has been attending the Black Veterans for Social Justice parade since its inception. It’s the easiest for him to get to at 73-years-old, as a local resident of Bed-Stuy. Lugo said the parade has helped him in the past get connected with all his benefits.

“Remember the men and women died defending this country,” Lugo said in an interview. “That’s why there will always be a Memorial Day.”

While thanking a veteran for their service may seem customary in today’s America, Vietnam Veteran Errol Vanmooden said that Americans have still failed to recognize the service of his fellow Vietnam service members.

“I remember my fallen brother in Vietnam. I remember the good times and the bad. I remember the holidays. Christmas, Birthdays. I remember the disrespectful welcome that I received back from Vietnam. I remember one person saying ‘are you part of the baby killers?’,” Vanmooden said.

While Vanmooden says he wants the day to be about celebrating the contributions of fallen soldiers, he couldn’t shake the bad memories that come with the day.

He remembers when he was injured on the battlefield, his buddies coming to help him. He was the only Black member of his unit, but that didn’t matter. Army green was the only color that mattered, he said.

He remembers his 22nd birthday. He was awoken by a barrage of heavy artillery fire early one morning in the jungles of Vietnam. Rockets would land and get stuck in the thick mud. He was sure he was going to die.

“I remember my brothers were always there for me,” Vanmooden said solemnly.

Exclusive: Kellogg’s added to historic registry

Kellogg’s, the famous 24-hour Williamsburg Diner, was added to the Historic Business Preservation Registry on Saturday.

The Historic Business Preservation Registry was created with the goal of providing educational and promotional assistance to businesses that have been located in a neighborhood for over 50 years. The program, administered by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, can receive nominations from local legislators and are decided on a rolling basis.

Elected officials and restaurant workers inside Kellogg’s Diner with the historical designation award.

Since around 1973, Kellogg’s has served Williamsburg residents morning, noon, and night. Despite the pressures the COVID-19 placed on local businesses, the Metropolitan Avenue-based eatery was able to continue serving families during the pandemic.

Navigating a business throughout a pandemic is difficult, but Irene Siderakis was able to pull it off – without any restaurant experience at all.

Before the pandemic, Irene was a stay-at-home mother for her four boys. She inherited the restaurant after her husband passed away unexpectedly in 2019.

“The worst things in life can hate you. But it doesn’t mean you can’t move forward in a positive direction, as long as you believe in yourself,” Siderakis said about what this moment meant to her. “As a woman I want to say that I’m proud of myself. I know I put my heart into it. I put all my strength into it. Just because my husband died there is the excuse to say we can’t. I’ve got four children in this world I’m responsible for. There is no can’t”.

Before her husband passed she didn’t know anything about the business—who the vendors were, how to handle payroll, or the day-to-day responsibilities. Now, she says she feels closer to him, knowing everything he did to help provide a life for her and her kids.

“It is just a fantastic, fantastic testimony to the community that this place holds that Kellogg’s fought through COVID and rose again, and reopened and kept their staff and kept everyone safe,” State Assemblywoman Emily Gallagher, who nominated the business for the registry, said while presenting the award. “They closed for two months during COVID, during which the owner became very, very ill, but still made sure that she was feeding the community. And I just think this is a beautiful example of what small businesses can do for our city and our states.

Siderakis has an emotional moment after being presented with the award

The 15 or so patrons got excited by the unexpected announcement, taking out their phones to capture the moment they got to be a part of.

“One of my first memories in about 1950 was that this [referring to her booth] was a caboose you know, like real diners used to be like train cars,” longtime patron Lorraine Franzese Scorsone, 68, said.

And she’s kept the tradition alive for the latest generation, regularly taking her two grandchildren to Kellogg’s.

“Kellogs has always been probably one of the biggest staples of this community,” 13-year-old Dahlia Prettr said. She said that she can’t even remember the first time going as it’s always been a piece of her life.“ So this community, no matter how much it’s changed, it’s always still been like that. Not a close-knit family by any means. But it’s still a family.”

“If you’re born and raised here, you know everything about Kellogg’s. You know how important it is early in the morning or very, very late at night,” South Williamsburg native and Brooklyn Borough President Reynoso said to some laughs. “And I just want to thank you again for being here for 50 years, when no one wanted to be in Williamsburg 30 years ago, you were here 50 years ago, and you guys maintained it and stood strong.”

And while much was made about the history of Kellogg’s on Saturday, Siderakis is even more excited for the future.

Siderakis receives Historical Business Award

Siderakis recently held their first comedy show at the diner the previous week, where Brooklyn Magazine reported over 75 people attended. She’s also been looking at expanding their takeout options, working to supply the food for ghost kitchens. She’s even gotten a request for someone to hold their wedding reception there.

But some things are going to stay the same. The friendly service the staff at Kellogg’s are known for will continue. The menu will be just as long. And, of course, it will stay open 24 hours a day.

“They believed in me, which was the biggest thing for me,” Siderakis said about how none of this would be possible without her staff. ”I didn’t know nothing. But they believed in me. And they stuck by me. And we got it together and we made it happen. And we supported one another with the customers that believed in us. I’m so grateful for everyone that kept coming back.

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