Brooklyn Municipal Building to be named after RGB
by Benjamin Fang
Sep 29, 2020 | 853 views | 0 0 comments | 58 58 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Outside of Brooklyn Borough Hall, a small memorial for Ginsburg was set up by mourners.
Outside of Brooklyn Borough Hall, a small memorial for Ginsburg was set up by mourners.
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Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the Brooklyn Municipal Building will be renamed after the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the Brooklyn Municipal Building will be renamed after the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
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Governor Cuomo lit up the Kosciuszko Bridge in blue to honor the late Justice Ginsburg, a Brooklyn native. (Photo: Darren McGee/Governor’s Office)
Governor Cuomo lit up the Kosciuszko Bridge in blue to honor the late Justice Ginsburg, a Brooklyn native. (Photo: Darren McGee/Governor’s Office)
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The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away on September 18 at the age of 87, will be honored in myriad ways in her native Brooklyn.

Last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the city will rename the Brooklyn Municipal Building after Ginsburg, who grew up in Flatbush and graduated from James Madison High School.

“Here’s someone of, and by, and for Brooklyn and this city, who did the greatest things on the world stage,” de Blasio said. “And that building will carry her name forevermore.”

The mayor said the city will honor Ginsburg’s life with her family “in the weeks to come.”

“We want to make sure we honor her in every conceivable way,” de Blasio said, “and especially in the borough that she came from that gave her so much of her strength and spirit.”

De Blasio was not the first elected official to suggest renaming the Brooklyn Municipal Building after the late Supreme Court Justice.

As early as 2018, Borough President Eric Adams had been calling for the Downtown Brooklyn building, which houses a number of city offices and sits across the street from Borough Hall, to be renamed in honor of Ginsburg.

Last March, Adams hosted a birthday rally for Ginsburg’s 86th birthday, which also celebrated her 25th year as a Supreme Court Justice. He collected more than 86,000 signatures on an online petition asking de Blasio to grant the honor.

In a statement, Adams said he was glad the mayor heeded the call.

“With Justice Ginsburg’s recent passing, this is a bittersweet moment,” he said. “But I take heart in knowing that young girls and boys who pass by the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Brooklyn Municipal Building will know her name, learn from her example, and pick up the baton to run their own relay toward a more just, equitable and fair America.

“All of us who looked up to her are grateful she is finally getting the posthumous recognition she deserves,” Adams added.

A few days earlier, Governor Andrew Cuomo honored the Brooklyn native in his own way, lighting up state landmarks, including the Kosciuszko Bridge, One World Trade Center and the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge in blue, which was reportedly Ginsburg’s favorite color.

He also announced that the state will build a statue of Ginsburg in Brooklyn. The governor will appoint a commission in the coming days that will provide recommendations on the design, location and installation of the memorial.

The commission will also reach out to the arts community, including arts institutions and organizations and individual artists.

“Justice Ruth Bader Gisnburg selflessly pursued truth and justice in a world of division, giving voice to the voiceless and uplifting those who were pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference,” Cuomo said. “As a lawyer, jurist and professor, she redefined gender equity and civil rights, and ensured America lived up to her founding ideals.

“She was a monumental figure of equality, and we can all agree that she deserves a monument in her honor,” he added. “Her legacy will live on in the progress she created for our society, and this statue will serve as a physical reminder of her many contributions to the America we know today and as an inspiration for those who will continue to build on her immense body of work for generations to come.”
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