Celebrating “Peace and Love” in Jamaica
by Jennifer Khedaroo
Feb 21, 2018 | 4727 views | 0 0 comments | 324 324 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Resurrection by Otto Neals
The Resurrection by Otto Neals
slideshow
The Harvest Is Over - And We Are Not Saved by Ann Tanksley
The Harvest Is Over - And We Are Not Saved by Ann Tanksley
slideshow
bye bye bluebird by J BellBey
bye bye bluebird by J BellBey
slideshow
As part of its Black History Month celebration, the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning (JCAL) is hosting the “Peace and Love” exhibition.

Running through April 30th, the exhibition features paintings, mixed media works and sculptures by artists Joseph S. Bell-Bey, Karl A. McIntosh, Otto Neals, Donovan Nelson, and Ann Tanksley.

Founded in 1972, JCAL mounts four to six exhibitions that explore issues in contemporary art and culture each year. This year’s theme involves how the art expressing the African American experience can build into a trail of discovery, peace and love.

“Each of the artists, in his or her way, has created works reflecting the African American experience, whether intentional or not, that has touched the viewers,” said Neals, who is also the exhibition’s curator. “And as we travel through the world, badly in need of solutions to its many problems, we hope with our art to find a path to Peace and Love.”

Neals, a painter, sculptor and printmaker, is originally from South Carolina but moved to Brooklyn with his family.

While he is self-taught, Neals did study briefly at the Brooklyn Museum with social realist painter Isaac Soyer and at the Bob Blackburn Printmaking Workshop with Mohammed Khalil, Roberto DeLamonica and Krishna Reddy. He is proficient in many mediums including oils, watercolors, pastels and wood and stone carving, some of which is included in the “Peace and Love” exhibition.

McIntosh is also a self-taught artist who works primarily with pastel, watercolor, acrylic, stone, wood and metal. He is known for his ability of transforming found objects into works of art. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, McIntosh later moved to Brooklyn where he developed a passion for bold and whimsical art.

His work is an honest portrayal of everyday life and the people who live it but on occasion, organizers said, and it takes on public figures and world events most often employing satire as thick as the layers of paint or paper he uses to depict them.

While the “Peace and Love” exhibition will run through April 30, the public is invited to meet the artists at the opening reception on Saturday, March 24 at 2 p.m. The Miller Gallery is open Monday through Saturday 10:00AM - 6:00PM, and is located within JCAL's landmarked building at 161-04 Jamaica Avenue in Jamaica.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet