Borough president recognizes cultural space for LEED certification
by Patrick Kearns
Jan 19, 2016 | 5730 views | 0 0 comments | 90 90 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo, UrbanGlass Executive Director Cybele Maylone. Borough President Eric Adams and BRIC President Leslie G. Schultz
Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo, UrbanGlass Executive Director Cybele Maylone. Borough President Eric Adams and BRIC President Leslie G. Schultz
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Borough President Eric Adams and Councilwoman Laurie Cumbo joined Bric Media Arts House and UrbanGlass to celebrate the Fort Greene arts center’s recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver designation.

The 60,000-square-foot space, which features performance and exhibition space and television production and art studios, recently received the designation for their environmentally friendly and stable design. They broke ground on the new space in 2011.

“We opened in October 2013, completing a journey for this building from a 3,800-seat vaudeville house and movie palace to a bowling alley to a printing company and finally to the 60,000-square-foot public cultural space that is home to two extraordinary arts organizations,” said BRIC President Leslie Schultz.

BRIC is the leading provider of free cultural programming in Brooklyn and one of the largest in the entire city, while UrbanGlass is the first and largest artist glass studio. Schultz said that their building is one of the only cultural institutions in the borough to receive LEED certification.

“Today we celebrate yet another reason to gleam with pride,” she said. “The LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council makes us think about sustainability of the arts in a very different and important way.”

The building was designed to minimize the consumption of natural resources in construction and reduce the demand for water and electricity. Adams read a proclamation that acknowledged the efforts of the groups to achieve a sustainable building, and discussed human sustainability as well.

“Sustainability goes in so many different directions,” Adams said. “As we talk about sustainability of our second mother planet Earth, we also must continue to sustain our relationships.”

Adams said that they are focusing on “protecting the hyphen” at Borough Hall, which means honoring the cultural history of the different races and people in the borough.

“We don’t get afraid when something seems different or challenging,” Adams said. “If we don’t ensure the sustainability of that hyphen, we’re going to lose what makes us Americans. So let's lead in not only greening our buildings, but enriching our lives.”

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