Hire affordable packers and movers in Pune - Saraswati pa... by diagodevilla
Saraswati packers and movers in Delhi provides best class packaging and moving services in affordable prices.
Dec 15, 2019 | 12 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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Best packers and movers in Pune - Saraswati Packer
by diagodevilla
Dec 15, 2019 | 2 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Finding the right relocation service provider when planning to relocate can be a daunting task. If you have no prior experience with packer and movers, it is possible to find yourself confused and not sure where to start. Packers and Movers Bangalore reference portals have made it seamless to find suitable experts across the globe.

These reference portals have reliable information you can use to reach a sound decision. Whether shifting from one town to the other or moving to another country, you will find these platforms to be very helpful. You can learn more here about the best Packers and Movers in Hyderabad reference platforms to visit.

With that in mind, let’s consider a few things to keep in mind when searching for a mover near you. First, it is a plus to examine the ability of a mover to move you. This is the right time to consider the kind of equipment and task force a mover has. Doing so enables you to make an informed decision. You can even ask the mover for a demo just to be sure everything will unfold well.

Trust is such a big thing to consider when hiring a moving company. Can you trust the company to move your assets? Answering this question is very important and can help you dodge the services of fake movers in the market. A single mistake here can leave you with nothing to call your own. Think of when you hire a fraudster to move your valuable assets. So, be keen when hiring.

How much are you planning to splash out? Your budget limits or gives you the freedom to consider more options when hiring. Requesting for quotes in advance is a plus as it helps to pick a mover who will not hurt your budget. If you visit the best relocation reference portals, you should be able to compare the pricing structure of different companies. To get some facts about moving, go to Saraswati packer.

The experience of the moving company is the other thing to weigh at this time. It is advisable to consider the length of time a mover has been in business. One, four or ten years? Often, moving companies with deep roots in the industry are the best option as they bring with them reliable knowledge. New moving companies are also a good option but may fail to address your needs well. For more information on this, tap on packers and movers in Pune.

 

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The Comeback Kid
by Nancy A. Ruhling
Dec 13, 2019 | 507 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Greg behind the wheel.
Greg behind the wheel.
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You can see him in the film “Charlie Boy.”
You can see him in the film “Charlie Boy.”
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Greg, a producer, comic and actor, spent time in Rikers as a youth.
Greg, a producer, comic and actor, spent time in Rikers as a youth.
slideshow
Greg Kritikos is pedaling his bicycle on 30th Avenue near 42nd Street. This is the place he grew up in, and everything – the good and the bad, the things he can’t forget and the things he doesn’t want to remember – happened to him in this neighborhood, which he’s called home for most of the past half -century. Greg, a producer, stand-up comic and actor who has been compared to Jackie Gleason, is a larger-than-life lovable tough guy with slicked-back black hair and a diamond pinkie ring. His New York accent is as thick as cement shoes. If you are not acquainted with his work, you soon will be: He’s the co-writer, producer and star of the feature-length film “Charlie Boy,” which was shot on the streets of Astoria and will be playing in local theaters around Christmas time. The movie, about a retired gangster who becomes a comedian to work through his grief over the killing of his son, is largely and loosely based on events in Greg’s life. Greg, who was born in Athens, Greece, arrived in Astoria with his parents and older sister when he was seven years old. “We came for the American dream, but it was more like the American nightmare,” he says. Things went sideways right from the start. Greg’s father, a professional soccer player, ended up opening a shoe-repair shop, and Greg, who didn’t know any English (“I once mixed up the word ‘beach’ with ‘bitch,’ as in ‘I went to the bitch’”) was ridiculed because his mother dressed him in the European style. “With my sandals, white tube socks and shaved head, I stuck out,” he says, adding that his was the only Greek family in the Irish-Italian neighborhood. “It was the early 1970s when boys wore their hair long. I got picked on a lot, and I had a lot of fear. “Kids started calling me Hamburger, a word I didn’t pronounce properly, but in my mind I wanted to tell them that someday I would be the Burger King,” he added. The family determined to stick it out for five years, but right before that self-imposed time limit was reached, Greg’s mother was hit by a drunken driver. Her leg was amputated above the knee. “The driver didn’t have insurance,” Greg says. “The medical bills were high, and we didn’t have the money to pay them.” Greg became a member of The Steinway Street Boys, which was more of an association than a gang, although one of the members was deported and became the John Gotti of Greece. He pulls up a photo of the boys on his smartphone; all are ominously clad in black leather. “Hey, it was the eighties, everyone was wearing leather,” he says. By the time he was 17, Greg had dropped out of high school to work in his brother-in-law’s Manhattan deli. He started drinking at 18 and began using coke at 23. The drug trade was his main occupation, and by the time he was 25, Greg was doing six months in Rikers for assault and narcotics trafficking, charges lodged during a sting operation he got caught up in. While he was on the inside, he was attacked by three inmates whose intent was murder. “One had an ice pick, one had a razor and one had a Master Lock tied up in a tube sock,” he says. “They sliced my ear, and I lost one tooth.” Greg dramatically pulls back his left ear to reveal the wound. “I never told my mom I was in prison,” he says. “She thought I was working with the Merchant Marines.” At any rate, when Greg was released, he didn’t change his habits, he escalated them, hustling and using coke and pot and drinking a lot. “Prison enhanced my reputation in the neighborhood,” he says. “The people who picked on me, let’s just say I returned the favor, and I hurt a couple of people’s ‘feelings.’” Eventually, he got a job as the director of security for a Greek developer, got married and had a son, who is now 24. By 2000, Greg’s life, by his own admission and fault, was pretty much a mess. “I hit rock bottom,” he says. “I was like a boat with broken sails. My wife and I separated (we are happily divorced now), I blew up to 385 pounds. I was drinking a bottle of Dewar’s every night and smoking coke and cigarettes. I developed a lot of problems,” he continued. “I was depressed, I had sleep apnea, high cholesterol and diabetes, but God kept me alive.” It took him nearly a decade to get his life back in order. After spending seven days detoxing in a hospital plus nearly four months at Phoenix House, Greg was ready to face the world head-on and head-clear again. “I make it a point to give back,” he says, adding that he was proud to recently give a talk to students at Lake Erie College in Ohio. “I give anti-addiction speeches at detox and rehab centers and prisons.” Ironically, he found his new life while sitting on a barstool. “I met a bartender at Cronin’s who thought I was a funny guy,” he says, adding that he continued to frequent drinking establishments after his recovery but didn’t imbibe alcohol. “She got me booked at the New York Comedy Club.” Greg’s six-minute stint was a success. “I wore a hat and sunglasses because I didn’t want anyone to recognize me,” he says. “I just said random things and people laughed.” He ditched his disguise and became a punch-line factory. “After I got sober, I briefly moved to Spokane, Washington, which is where my comedy career took off,” he says. “I wasn’t going to come back to New York, but a part in a movie, plus free air fare to the city, lured me.” Today, Greg’s a regular on the comedy circuit; his third one-man show, “Sober Is the New High,” typically sells out. “The Witless Protection Program,” an animated series he developed with former Marvel Comics editor Mike Rockwitz, will be released next year. Greg says “Charlie Boy” has opened new doors for him. He’s already writing another feature film, “The Shoemaker’s Son,” which is a semi-autobiographical account of immigrant life in Queens that he’ll have a cameo role in. As part of his research, Greg made a mammoth 42-day trip to Greece for the first time since he came to America. “I did a lot of soul searching and it wasn’t easy,” he says. “I wasn’t with family, and I was all alone. It was an incredible experience, and the people in the islands were very genuine.” Conceding that his real life reads like the improbable plot of a B movie, Greg says that he hopes his experiences help others make positive changes. “Everybody has an opportunity,” he says. “I’m 56, but I have so much energy that I feel like I’m 15. I’ve been through so many things. I’m grateful every day that I’m alive.” Nancy A. Ruhling may be reached at Nruhing@gmail.com. Follow her on Twitter at @nancyruhling and visit astoriacharacters.com.
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Borough Hall co-sponsors overdose response training
by Sara Krevoy
Dec 13, 2019 | 629 views | 0 0 comments | 48 48 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The number of unintentional drug overdose deaths in New York City is on the decline since 2018, one year after the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency. In Queens, the reduction was notably sharp, with the number of overdose deaths dropping to 215 in 2018 from 270 the previous year. Yet, according to data from the city’s Department of Health, one New Yorker dies of a drug overdose every seven hours - more yearly than from homicides, suicides and motor vehicle crashes combined. Of those deaths, more than 80 percent involve opioids, and a deeper look shows nearly 50 percent are related to fentanyl, a highly potent opioid that is increasingly popular across the country. On the heels of similar session in late September, Borough Hall officials collaborated with NYC Health+Hospitals to co-sponsor another public training on how to respond to an opioid overdose. “The numbers are going down, which is a positive,” said Brent Weitzberg, director of Health and Human Services at Borough Hall. “The negative is that’s still 215 lives that we need to save and that we know are important. That’s the loss of a brother, a sister, a child, a cousin, whatever the case may be. “We don’t do this for pomp and circumstance,” he added. “We do this because we know it works.” Last Thursday, residents convened in the auditorium of Queens Hospital for a two-hour presentation contextualizing the nationwide opioid epidemic and its impact on New York City. Speakers also discussed avenues of holistic treatment available at city hospitals for those struggling with opioid addiction. “Numerous studies have shown that, particularly for someone who has been using opioids for a long time, it’s very difficult to achieve abstinence without medication,” said Dr. John Mott, director of the hospital’s chemical dependency services program. Dr. Mott discussed three medicines - methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone - that are typically used with patients involved in medication-assisted treatment. He advised that those seeking to take steps toward recovery should contact Health+Hospitals to learn more about its comprehensive chemical dependency program. One component of the well-established program, which has served the community for decades, is a patient-centered approach that is based on the level of care needed. Patients can participate in group, family or individual counseling, as well as twelve-step meetings and an intensive rehabilitation clinic. “Our goal is to restore functioning and help people cope with their lives,” said Dr. Laurie Vitagliano. “So the therapy component is very important in terms of helping people establish other mechanisms for dealing with issues in their lives, mending relationships and maintaining themselves in recovery.” Other substance abuse services include a DWI program for those with legal issues from driving while under the influence, and a specialized program for patients ages 60 and older struggling with addiction. Certified Recovery Peer Advocates, those in sustained recovery from addiction themselves, are available at the hospital to help guide patients facilitate treatment. The event concluded with a training presentation on how to identify an opioid overdose and properly administer naloxone, a nasal spray medication that can reverse fatal symptoms. Also known by the brand name Narcan, naloxone counteracts the life-threatening depression within the central nervous and respiratory systems, which occur during an opioid overdose. When a person is suffering an overdose from opioids, they will become unconscious or unresponsive and have slow or stopped breathing. They begin to turn blue-gray in the lips and nail beds, and a first responder might hear a snore or gurgling sound. Those overdosing on fentanyl also exhibit muscle tensing, and it may be hard to move their limbs. When given in time, the medication can restore normal breathing in an individual who is suffering an overdose from heroin, prescription painkillers or fentanyl. Though widely used by emergency medical personnel and first responders, naloxone can be legally used by non-medical professionals as well to save lives. Even so, any Good Samaritan responding to an opioid overdose should call 911 to bring emergency medical personnel to the scene. The training session last week came as part of an effort by NYC Health+Hospitals to hold free opioid overdose presentations, in addition to naloxone training and dispensing events, at all 11 public hospitals citywide before the new year. After training, free overdose rescue kits containing two doses of naloxone nasal spray were distributed to attendees who felt inclined to take one home. “It’s about getting that information out,” said Lorinda Sherwood, director of mental health and outpatient services, after the event. “I am ecstatic with the turnout.”
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